Law 1 – Attackers Will Always Find Their Way

This is the first post of a series of ten posts. The order of the ten laws is not meaningful excepted for this first one. For three reasons:

  • It is the most important law as it is never failed. It should be engraved deeply in the mind of every security practitioner.
  • It is my favorite law. In 1996, when I founded the Thomson Security Laboratories, this law allowed us to enter into the Hollywood arena. We were the first to claim it systematically in front of the MPAA members. At this time, it was not obvious. In 1998, DVD John with DeCSS illustrated its pertinence. Studios started to listen to us. A side effect of the first law is that the world will always need good security practitioners. This is a reassuring effect. J
  • If somebody claim his or her system is unbreakable, then I already know that the system is snake oil.

No secure system is infallible. Any secure system is doomed to fail. Attackers will always find a way to defeat it. Even in ancient mythologies, it was true. For instance, invulnerable heroes such as Greek Achilles or Nordic Siegfried has a vulnerable spot. Along the History, this law has been right. Invincible Roman legions were defeated. Unsinkable RMS Titanic sank. Bletchley Park decrypted German Enigma. Mobile devices are jailbroken.

The only cryptographic system that has been demonstrated to be unbreakable in theory is Shannon’s One Time Pad. Unfortunately, it is not practicable. The symmetric key must be truly random and be of the same size that the clear text. Then, you have the problem to distribute the symmetric key securely, i.e., by secure sneaker net. Not very useful for everyday usage.

There is a strong asymmetry between security defenders and attackers. The attacker needs to succeed only once whereas the defender has to succeed every time. The attacker benefits from all the security technologies and tools that the defender may use. The attacker may put a lot of effort, resources and time for the exploit, as for instance, with high-profile Advanced Persistent Attacks (APT). Nature favors the attacker. The second law of thermodynamics states that entropy tends not to decrease. It highlights that it is easier to break a system than to build it. Creating increases the order, thus reduces entropy. Whereas breaking increases the chaos thus increases entropy. This is the sad, cruel reality of security.

Security designers must never deny the first law, but rather put this heuristic at the heart of their design.

The designer must expect the attackers to push the limits.
Any design operates within a set of limits defined by its initial requirements. The system should work correctly within these boundaries and should be tested within these limits. Unfortunately, an attacker may attempt to operate outside these boundaries to get unexpected behavior. The security designer should ensure either that these limits are out of reach or at least that the system should detect the violation of these boundaries to react accordingly. Typical examples are buffer overflows and SQL injections.

Systems will have vulnerabilities.
Publishing vulnerabilities is one of the best methods to reach a safer cyber world. Not only will the solution provider close the holes but the publication of the vulnerability will also educate the designers. Obscurity is dangerous for security (We will address it with Law 3). Nevertheless, implementers must have a reasonable amount of time to fix the issue before the public disclosure of the vulnerability. This is called responsible vulnerability disclosure.

As any system will be broken, the designed system must be ready to survive by the updating of its defense mechanisms. Without renewability, the system will be definitively dead. Renewability is a mandatory security requirement. The side effect is that the hacking scene must be monitored to learn as soon as possible about breaches and vulnerabilities.

As any defense will fail, a secure system should implement multiple defenses. Medieval builders knew about it. Middle Age castles had several bulwarks to protect the keep. Each one being increasingly higher than the previous one, It should construct successive obstacles that the attacker has to cross successfully. Diversity in protection makes the exploit harder to perform. A little ranting; one the current buzz messages of some vendors is “forget about firewalls and anti-viruses, use new method X”. Perimetric defense is of course not anymore sufficient to defend against modern threats. Nevertheless, the old-fashioned tools are still necessary for in-depth defense. Would you get rid of firewalls, then your network would become the weakest point of your system and would bypass new method X.

As any system will be broken one day, data may be corrupted or lost. Regular, frequent air-gapped backup of all non-constructible data is the ultimate defense. Back-up is today the only effective answer to ransomware (if you do not have a critical issue with data needed immediately, as for instance in hospitals). Air gapped is important to protect against a new generation of ransomware encrypting remote or cloud-based servers.

As a conclusion, never ask the question “if the system would be broken, …” but rather “Whenever the system WILL be broken, …”. The work of the security practitioner is to limit the risks of a breach, to detect its occurrence, and to mitigate the impact of such breach. The following laws will help in this difficult task.

Hacking reCAPTCHA (2)

In 2012, the hacking team DefCon 949 disclosed their method to break Google’s reCaptcha. They used weaknesses in the version dedicated to visually impaired persons. End of 2014, Google replaced its letter-warping version with a user-friendlier version. It is based on the recognition of a set of images illustrating an object within a set of nine images.

At Black Hat Asia 2016, S. Sivakorn, J. Polakis and A. Keromytis from Columbia disclosed a method to break this visual captcha. They used many tools, but the core of the attack is the use of image annotation services, such as Google Reverse Image Search (GRIS) or Clarifai. These tools return a best guess description of the image, i.e., a list of potential tags. For instance, for the picture of a go-ban illustrating the blog post about AlphaGo, Clarifai returns chess, desktop, strategy, wood, balance, no person, table, and game, whereas GRIS returns go game. They use many tricks to increase the efficiency. My preferred one is to use GRIS to locate a high-resolution instance of each proposed challenge. They discovered that the accuracy of these annotation services decreased with the resolution of the submitted image.

They obtained a 70% accuracy for Google reCaptcha and 83.5% for Facebook’s version.

Sivakorn, Suphannee, Jason Polakis, and Angelos D. Keromytis, “I’m Not a Human: Breaking the Google reCaptcha” presented at Black Hat Asia, Singapore, 2016.

 

Easier fingerprint spoofing

In September 2013, the German Computer Chaos Club (CCC) demonstrated the first hack of Apple’s TouchID. Since then, they repeatedly defeated every new version both from Apple and Samsung. Their solution implies to create a dummy finger. This creation is a complex, lengthy process. It uses a typical photographic process with the copy of the actual fingerprint acting as the negative image. Thus, the master fingerprint is printed onto a transparent sheet at 1,200 dpi. This printed mask is exposed on the photosensitive PCB material. The PCB material is developed, etched and cleaned to create a mold. A thin coat of graphite spray is applied to improve the capacitive response. Finally, a thin film of white wood glue is smeared into the mold to make it opaque and create the fake finger.

Two researchers (K. CAO and A. JAIN) at the Michigan State University disclosed a new method to simplify the creation of the fake finger. They use conductive ink from AgIC. AgIC sells ink cartridges for Brother printers. Rather than making a rubber finger, they print a conductive 2D image of the fingerprint. And, they claim it works. Surprisingly, they scan the user’s fingerprint at 300 dpi whereas the CCC used 2,400 dpi to defeat the latest sensors.

As fingerprint on mobile devices will be used for more than simple authentication but also payment, it will be paramount to come with a new generation of biometrics sensors that also detect the liveliness of the scanned subject.

Attackers are smart

In 2010, Steven MURDOCH, Ross ANDERSON, and their team disclosed a weakness in the EMV protocol. Most Credit / Debit card equipped with a chip use the EMV (Europay, MasterCard, Visa) protocol. The vulnerability enabled to bypass the authentication phase for a given category of transactions. The card does not condition transaction authorization on successful cardholder verification. At the time of disclosure, Ross’s team created a Proof Of Concept using an FPGA. The device was bulky. Thus, some people minored the criticality.

The team of David NACCACHE recently published an interesting paper disclosing an exemplary work on a real attack exploiting this vulnerability: “when organized crime applies academic results.” The team performed a non-destructive forensic analysis of forged smart cards that exploited this weakness. The attacker combined in a plastic smart card the chip of a stolen EMV card (in green on the picture) and an other smart card chip FUN. The FUN chip acted like a man in the middle attack. It intercepted the communication between the Point of Sales (PoS) and the actual EMV chip. The FUN chip filtered out the VerifyPIN commands. The EMV card did not verify the PIN and thus was not blocked in case of the presentation of wrong PINs. On the other side, the FUN chip acknowledged the PIN for the PoS which continues the fraudulent transaction.

Meanwhile, the PoS have been updated to prevent this attack.

This paper is an excellent example of forensics analysis as well as responsible disclosure. The paper was published after the problem was solved in the field. It discloses an example of a new potential class of attacks: Chip in The Middle.

Law 1: Attackers will always find their way. Moreover, they even read academic publications and use them.

Using temperature as a covert channel

CaptureFour researchers from the Ben-Gurion University disclosed a new covert channel.   A covert channel is a mean to transfer information through a channel that was not supposed to transfer information.   Covert channels are at the heart of side channel attacks.  Many covert channels have been investigated, e.g. power supply, radio frequency, or sound.

Their system coined BitWhisper uses temperature as the carrying ‘media.’  The interesting feature of BitWhisper is that it may cross air-gapped computers.   Air-gapped computers have no digital connections (wired or wireless).  Air-gap is the ultimate isolation between networks or computers.

In BitWhisper, the attacker owns one computer on each side of the air-gap.  Furthermore, both computers are in the same vicinity.  Modern computers are equipped with thermal sensors that can be read by software.  On the emitter computer, the attacker increases or decreases the computation effort drastically, thus creating a variation of the internal temperature, for instance by using CPU and GPU stress tests.   The higher the computation effort, the higher the internal temperature.   The receiving computer monitors stays with a constant computing power and measures the variation of its internal thermal probes.

Obviously, this covert channel has a big limitation.  The distance separating both computers should not exceed 40 cm.  At 35 cm, they succeeded to induce a one degree Celsius variation in the receiving computer.   The system would probably not work in a data center.     The orientation of the computers is also impacting.  The overall throughput is of a few bits per day.

Nevertheless, it is an interesting idea, although not practical.   In another setup where the attacker could use an external thermal camera as a receiver, rather than a generic computer, the efficiency of this covert channel could be increased.

 

Guri, Mordechai, Matan Monitz, Yisroel Mirski, and Yuval Elovici. “BitWhisper: Covert Signaling Channel between Air-Gapped Computers Using Thermal Manipulations.” arXiv, March 26, 2015. http://arxiv.org/abs/1503.07919.
PS:  this draft version does not describe the communication protocol

Stealing account with mobile phone-based two-factor authentication

Attackers often entice users to become the weakest link.   Phishing and scams exploit the human weakness.  These attacks become even creepier if the attacker circumvents legitimate security mechanisms.   Two factor authentication offers better security than simple login/password.  The use of mobile phone as the second factor is becoming mainstream.  It is impossible to steal our account without stealing our phone.  We feel safer.  Should we?

Symantec reported a new used method to steal the account of users despite the use of a two-factor authentication.   Here is the scheme.

Mallory wants to gain access to Alice’s account.  He knows Alice email address and her mobile phone number as well as her account.  For a social engineer, this information is not difficult to collect.  It is part of the usual exploration phase before the actual hack.   Mallory contacts the service provider of Alice’s account and requests a password reset.  He selects the method that sends a digital code to Alice’s mobile phone.   The service provider sends an SMS to Alice’s mobile phone with this code. Simultaneously, Mallory sends an SMS to Alice impersonating the service provider.  Once more, this is not difficult as many providers do not use a specific number.  This SMS explains to Alice that there was some suspicious activity on her account.  To verify her account, she must reply to this SMS with the code that was sent previously to her.  Gullible Alice obeys.  Mallory has now the code that the service provider requests to reset Alice password.  Mallory gains entire access to Alice’s account with the involuntary help of Alice.

This type of attack can be used on most web services, e.g., webmails like gmail.  Obviously, Alice should not have replied to this SMS.  She should have followed the known procedure and not an unknown one.  She may have been cautious that the two phone numbers were different.

This is a perfect example of social engineering.   The only answer is education.  Therefore, spread this information around you,  The more people are aware, the less they will be prone to be hacked.  Never forget Law 6: You are the weakest link.